Pandemic

How to safely go to the dentist during the pandemic

My tongue first detected the problem when it caught a sharp edge on my teeth: A hefty hunk of my back right molar was missing. I’m not sure how it happened, but it meant that after months of avoiding any sort of physical closeness with other people, I needed to brave the dentist’s chair.

With the pandemic raging across the United States, the office I entered in Alexandria, Virginia, looked very different from the one I had visited months before. Two cups of pens sat on the receptionist’s desk, one for “clean” writing utensils and the other for those recently used. A plexiglass partition divided me from the rest of the office behind, and everyone—myself included—donned a mask.

Dental work is a uniquely risky environment for spreading SARS-CoV-2, since medical practitioners work face-to-face with open-mouthed patients for extended periods of time. “We, unfortunately, work in a danger zone,” says Mark

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The Pandemic and the Dentist

On March 16, the ADA issued the following statement:

“The American Dental Association recognizes the unprecedented and extraordinary circumstances dentists and all health care professionals face related to growing concern about COVID-19. The ADA is deeply concerned for the health and well-being of the public and the dental team. In order for dentistry to do its part to mitigate the spread of COVID-19, the ADA recommends dentists nationwide postpone elective procedures for the next three weeks. Concentrating on emergency dental care will allow us to care for our emergency patients and alleviate the burden that dental emergencies would place on hospital emergency departments.”

“As health care professionals, it is up to dentists to make well-informed decisions about their patients and practices.”

Various local dental societies have issued statements echoing these recommendations. It is unlikely that these limitations would be lifted soon.

Coronavirus has a global reach, is in over 200

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A visit to the dentist will get expensive. But is it safe to book an appointment during the pandemic?

WASHINGTON: Is it safe to visit the dentist during the COVID-19 pandemic? Dentists can’t eliminate all risk, but they are taking steps to minimize the chances of spreading the coronavirus.

You’ll likely notice changes as soon as you enter the office. Many dentists have removed magazines from waiting rooms, for example, as well as some chairs to encourage social distancing.

They also are spacing out appointments to avoid crowding their offices.

You may be asked to arrive for your appointment with a facial covering and to wait in your car until equipment is cleaned and the dentist is ready. Before receiving care, you can also expect staff to take your temperature and ask about COVID-19 symptoms.

Procedures are changing, too.

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Some dentists are charging for all the extra gear, so ask in advance if you should expect extra costs.

Coronavirus is spread mainly through droplets people spray when

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Florida braces for presidential primary amid a health pandemic

Since the novel coronavirus outbreak was declared a pandemic on Wednesday, state election officials have made a number of changes, from relocating polling sites to encouraging more early voting, to protect the health of the state’s 4 million people who are over the age of 65 and represent one-fifth of the total population of the state.

“Our recommendation would be if there’s a polling location in assisted living facility, allow the residents to vote there,” Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis said at a press conference on Wednesday. “But maybe the general public should have the option or be directed to go to a different polling location.”

Some of the changes being implemented by election officials across the state include relocating polling sites away from assisted living senior communities.

Hillsborough County, on the west coast of the state, immediately announced changes to polling locations that were set to be at large assisted

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Getting to the dentist during a pandemic

“I was having some pain,” she said. “With the pandemic I said, ‘I’ll just have to wait until everything’s over.'”

That Sunday, though, the pain became extreme. When she found a dentist who could see her, she learned she needed an emergency root canal.

As part of the country’s response to the Covid-19 crisis, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended that dentists put off “elective procedures, surgeries and non-urgent dental visits,” allowing only emergency visits until the threat subsides.

That’s because dental work could place dentists and dental hygienists at risk for Covid-19 infection, according to the US Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

The government agency includes dental health-care providers in the “very high exposure risk” category. Routine dental tools such as air-water syringes can send droplets of saliva through the air, potentially carrying the virus with them. Even recommended personal
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Amid coronavirus pandemic, black mistrust of medicine looms

NEW YORK (AP) — Just as the new coronavirus was declared a global pandemic, gym members in New York City frantically called the fitness center where Rahmell Peebles worked, asking him to freeze their memberships.

Peebles, a 30-year-old black man who’s skeptical of what he hears from the news media and government, initially didn’t see the need for alarm over the virus.

“I felt it was a complete hoax,” Peebles said. “This thing happens every two or four years. We have an outbreak of a disease that seems to put everybody in a panic.”

Peebles is among roughly 40 million black Americans deciding minute by minute whether to put their faith in government and the medical community during the coronavirus pandemic. Historic failures in government responses to disasters and emergencies, medical abuse, neglect and exploitation have jaded generations of black people into a distrust of public institutions.

“I’ve just been

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Coronavirus Chicago: Woodlawn dentist Dr. Ogbonna Bowden provides relief for dental emergencies, despite pandemic

CHICAGO (WLS) — With a fractured tooth, one South Shore resident couldn’t wait.

“By this weekend, extreme pain. I was extremely uncomfortable,” said Kortney Mims.

Mims got her temperature checked and found careful safety protocol at My Dental Gallery, including a device that limits contact during dental procedures.

“That reduces the aerosol by 90%, and we have our regular PPE to protect us from whatever comes out of the patient’s mouth,” said Dr. Ogbonna Bowden from My Dental Gallery.

“I’m just very grateful they could get me in and take care of me at such a crazy time,” Mims said. “I have a huge smile underneath this mask I’m so happy and I’m so relieved.”

Bowden closed his three dental offices but is seeing patients with dental emergencies at his Woodlawn office on63rd Street.

“It’s natural, if you have pain, natural you would go to the ER, but we don’t

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These Pictures Show How US Hospital Ships Will Help Fight The Coronavirus Pandemic

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On Monday, the USNS Comfort docked in New York City to aid in the area’s response to the coronavirus pandemic. The Comfort, along with the USNS Mercy, which docked last Friday in Los Angeles, are 70,000-ton hospital ships that were built from converted oil tankers during the Cold War. Each ship has the capacity of 1,000 beds and a medical staff of up to 1,200. In addition to 12 fully equipped operating rooms, both the Comfort and the Mercy also offer radiology and dentistry services, medical and optometry labs, a pharmacy, and two oxygen-producing plants.

Since 1986, the Mercy and the Comfort have offered relief following both domestic and international disasters, including to New York City after 9/11, Puerto Rico following Hurricane Maria, and Haiti after the

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